Ex-US Senate Leader Harry Reid Dies At 82


FILES) In this file photo taken on December 8, 2016 US Senate Minority Leader Senator Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks during his portrait unveiling on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.  AFP

Former US Senate majority leader Harry Reid, a Nevada Democrat who rose from humble beginnings to lead the upper chamber during the presidencies of George W. Bush and Barack Obama, died Tuesday. He was 82. 

“I am heartbroken to announce the passing of my husband,” his wife, Landra, said in a statement released to US media, adding he died “peacefully this afternoon, surrounded by our family.”

Reid, who used his experience in Congress to help Obama steer his landmark Affordable Care Act through the Senate, had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2018.

Laconic and soft-spoken, Reid was born and raised in the mining town of Searchlight, Nevada on December 2, 1939, in a house with no hot water or indoor toilets.

A prize-fighter in his youth, he used his pugilistic instincts to work his way up to becoming one of the longest-serving majority leaders in US Senate history, and even called his memoir “The Good Fight.”

President Joe Biden, who served as Obama’s vice president and with Reid for two decades in the Senate, said in a statement his former colleague was a “giant of our history” and one of the “all-time great Senate Majority Leaders.”

“For Harry, it wasn’t about power for power’s sake. It was about the power to do right for the people.”

Obama on Tuesday made public a letter he had written to Reid shortly before his death, in which he said: “I wouldn’t have been president had it not been for your encouragement and support, and I wouldn’t have got most of what I got done without your skill and determination.”

Current Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer, a Democrat from New York, tweeted Reid was “one of the most amazing individuals I’ve ever met.”

“He never forgot where he came from and used those boxing instincts to fearlessly fight those who were hurting the poor & middle class.”

 ‘Skill and determination’

Despite his hardscrabble upbringing, Reid was elected to the Senate in 1986 and became the chamber’s Democratic leader in the 2004 elections.

He served as the majority leader from 2007 to 2015.

Reid often referred to his working-class origins — his father was a miner, his mother a laundress, and neither parent graduated from high school.

He hitchhiked 40 miles (65 kilometers) as a teenager to attend the nearest high school, then graduated from Utah State University and put himself through George Washington University Law School by working nights as a member of the US Capitol Police.

Quixotic, he once filibustered the Republicans by himself for nine hours, reading from the history book he wrote about his hometown of Searchlight.

Reid was more conservative than most other Democrats in the Senate.

A practicing Mormon, he was staunchly against abortion rights — a stance that sometimes found him working at cross purposes with others in his Democratic caucus.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called Reid a “titan,” describing him as “a leader of immense courage and ferocious conviction who worked tirelessly to achieve historic progress for the American people.”

Mitch McConnell, the Republican minority leader in the Senate, said Reid’s rise from poverty to political power was a “quintessentially American story, and it took Harry’s legendary toughness, bluntness and tenacity to make it happen.”

Reid had remained outspoken and blunt even in retirement.

He slammed McConnell in 2020 for ramming through then-president Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney-Barrett just two months before the election, after having refused to allow a vote on an Obama nominee nine months before the 2016 election.

“He and the chairman of the judiciary committee — it’s just terrible what they’ve done… They are such hypocrites,” Reid said of McConnell at the time.

AFP

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